32 places to put stuff

I have a lot of places in which I put things I care about.

I use Reminders to store…well, reminders of things I need to do. Basic lists.

I have a wish list of stuff I want to buy on Amazon, but then I have another list of other non-Amazon stuff to buy in Reminders.

I also have a few lists and notes for things in Apple Notes.

I keep my passwords securely in 1Password.

I use Trello to manage projects, but not all projects because not everyone uses that.

For some things, I need to make a Google Doc or Sheet. (Somehow, I’ve literally never had a need for a Google Slides presentation.)

Sometimes those projects have other materials. If I’m collaborating, they get shoved into Google Drive or (occasionally) Dropbox.

If it’s a personal project, it’s most likely iCloud Drive.

If it’s something in Adobe’s ecosystem, it might end up in Adobe Creative Cloud – I barely ever use it, but sometimes things occasionally end up in there.

I use Scanbot to scan papers, receipts and stuff for storage in one of these places

If it’s a work thing, it goes to Sharepoint which also includes a hook into OneDrive.

Sometimes it’s a manual or guide book for something, in which case it goes to iBooks, which is basically iCloud but also sort of not. Speaking of iCloud services and reading, Safari Reading List also houses some reading materials that I care about.

Photos can of course be stored in many places – it doesn’t really matter where they go as long as they’re everywhere all the time. In case they aren’t, well, they start in iCloud Photo Library, then go to Google Photos and Amazon Prime Photos.

All this stuff backs up to one of two external hard drives, and an Amazon S3 bucket.

Sometimes I write. I like Markdown for my own personal writing, so I write lyrics, creative ideas and blog posts like this one in Ulysses.

I can’t use that for my day job, though, so for that I use OneNote to write & share notes & documentation with my team.

We use a proprietary solution for managing technical projects.

Roadmap documents? Excel and Word. Not Trello, at least yet, because I need to get people to adopt it and we’re a pretty tight Microsoft shop. Speaking of which, Powerpoint.

We still use Slack to communicate, and I use it for some other things. Sometimes I save notes and to-dos as starred Slack messages.

Of course, there’s always stuff in one of 3 Gmail inboxes, my work email via Microsoft Exchange.


This is a list of apps in which I can put things I care about. They all have incredibly discrete functions in which they’re invaluable to me, but they all each have storage capabilities too. There’s also all the physical papers and forms and stuff filed away in a bookcase.

Thank goodness cross-platform search technologies these days aren’t awful, because if I had to remember in which place I stored something, I would be lost pretty much constantly. As much as the app economy and tech startups fascinate me, it’s almost too easy to lose track of everything. If productivity tools like Workflow and IFTTT make it so much easier to keep things in sync, and there’s backup solutions galore, why does the digital side of my world still feel so fragmented?

As much as Apple’s plan to store users’ entire Desktops and Documents folders within iCloud for syncing purposes is slightly nerve-wracking, I appreciate the effort to help consumers keep their shit in one place. I realize this anxiety is partly my own neuroses and my being raised on a file system paradigm, but I also have to imagine that the fragmentation of the cloud storage (and general digital storage) markets are part of why tech is so overwhelming for some.

The wonderful future, or my phone is slowly becoming my wallet

Since Alicia and I moved back into Boston proper, I've started to hold cash on me much less frequently. Back in NYC or up in Salem, most of the establishments we frequent only accepted certain credit cards; many were cash-only.

Now, I can use Apple Pay or order online from pretty much anywhere I frequent – cabs & Uber, groceries from Trader Joe's, Starbucks and most other local chains – for everything else, I'm only really using one of two debit/credit cards. My only actual use for cash, except when I'm not in Boston, is to pay my barber every month. This has been a wonderful way to live, if anything because I have to worry about having less with me at any given time. My only further request is that I could get my driver's license and MBTA subway pass somehow onto my iPhone – then I could ditch my wallet almost completely.

Having a thinner wallet is kind of amazing, but my iPhone is starting to feel like a single point of failure. What if I drop it and crack the screen or damage the NFC chip or the Touch ID button? The 6s Plus has amazing battery life1, but what if it dies? Do I replace my wallet with my little Anker portable charger in my back pocket? What if I lose or forget that? What if I get mugged? Or worst yet, what if I lose the phone due to my own idiocy? How will I get my goddamn Venti iced coffee?

It gets me thinking about product redundancy – the physical wallet begins to act as backup for my virtual Wallet. But what happens when I have no need for a physical wallet anymore, other than to cover my ass if my phone dies? That's kind of an annoying prospect? Is that what Apple's betting on with the Apple Watch, if you ignore the lifestyle play? When does the "all-powerful device" with several obvious Achilles heels require redundancy, especially when you don't want to also carry your phone in an Otterbox case and with a portable charger constantly?

It's all really fascinating, is all. It's interesting to me that we still don't have a good, trusted, redundant solution here that's also convenient and cheap. We have it with our digital files thanks to name-your-cloud-storage-and/or-backup solution, but credit cards, identification and other highly physical-world things are still confined in your pocket or purse one way or another.

I get excited for our inevitable Minority Report-like future in which we could have public kiosks where, via a retina or thumbprint scan, you could retrieve a temporary copy of your ID, driver's license, last credit card used, or whatever you lost while out in the world. Dropped your phone and it's useless? Scan your finger at a Touch ID kiosk and you can automatically have a temporary ATM card printed instantly for use. Got mugged or lost your phone in an unfamiliar place? A quick scan could get you quick access to emergency response care, your Medical ID and history, and/or automatically wipe your phone and notify a loved one that you're okay. I don't know nearly enough about the technical complexity of making this work in practice – the scanners would need to be sanitary, damage-resistant, weather-proof, whatever else – clearly there are a lot of holes to this. It's almost certainly easily hackable if we're not careful.

But it'd at least be super cool, right?

  1. Except when I'm testing iOS betas…oops, maybe I should stop doing that.